Famous Quotes from ...

Blaise Pascal



    Faith indeed tells what the senses do not tell, but not the contrary of what they see. It is above them and not contrary to them.

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    In faith there is enough light for those who want to believe and enough shadows to blind those who don't.

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    Noble deeds that are concealed are most esteemed.

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    Thus so wretched is man that he would weary even without any cause for weariness... and so frivolous is he that, though full of a thousand reasons for weariness, the least thing, such as playing billiards or hitting a ball, is sufficient enough to amuse him.

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    Imagination disposes of everything; it creates beauty, justice, and happiness, which are everything in this world.

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    Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of a river and his ruler has a quarrel with mine, though I have not quarrelled with him?

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    Justice and power must be brought together, so that whatever is just may be powerful, and whatever is powerful may be just.

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    Man's greatness lies in his power of thought.

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    We are not satisfied with real life; we want to live some imaginary life in the eyes of other people and to seem different from what we actually are

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    When I consider the short duration of my life, swallowed up in the eternity before and after, the little space I fill, and even can see, engulfed in the infinite immensity of space of which I am ignorant, and which knows me not, I am frightened, and am astonished at being here rather than there, why now rather than then?

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    Nature is an infinite sphere whose center is everywhere and whose circumference is nowhere

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    Nature diversifies and imitates; art imitates and diversifies.

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    Mutual cheating is the foundation of society.

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    Love has its reasons that Reason knows not

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    Men despise religion. They hate it and are afraid it may be true.

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    There are only two kinds of men: the righteous who believe they are sinners, the sinners who believe they are righteous.

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    Habit is the second nature which destroys the first.

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    Habit is a second nature that destroys the first. But what is nature? Why is habit not natural? I am very much afraid that nature itself is only a first habit, just as habit is a second nature.

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    True nature being lost, everything becomes its own nature; as the true good being lost, everything becomes its own true good.

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    Men blaspheme what they do not know.

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    Man is but a reed, the weakest in nature; but he is a thinking reed.

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    This religion taught to her children what men have only been able to discover by their greatest knowledge.

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    The charm of fame is so great that we like every object to which it is attached, even death.

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    We conceal it from ourselves in vain - we must always love something. In those matters seemingly removed from love, the feeling is secretly to be found, and man cannot possibly live for a moment without it.

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    The greater intellect one has, the more originality one finds in men. Ordinary persons find no difference between men.

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    Nature confuses the skeptics and reason confutes the dogmatists

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    Our nature consist in motion; complete rest is death.

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    The least movement is of importance to all nature. The entire ocean is affected by a pebble.

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