Famous Quotes from ...

Charles Caleb Colton



    Friendship often ends in love; but love in friendship - never.

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    Marriage is a feast where the grace is sometimes better than the dinner.

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    Much may be done in those little shreds and patches of time which every day produces, and which most men throw away.

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    In life we shall find many men that are great, and some that are good, but very few men that are both great and good.

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    Men's arguments often prove nothing but their wishes.

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    Life isn't like a book. Life isn't logical or sensible or orderly. Life is a mess most of the time. And theology must be lived in the midst of that mess.

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    Men are born with two eyes, but with one tongue, in order that they should see twice as much as they say

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    I'm aiming by the time I'm fifty to stop being an adolescent.

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    There is this paradox in pride it makes some men ridiculous, but prevents others from becoming so

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    War kills men, and men deplore the loss; but war also crushes bad principles and tyrants, and so saves societies.

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    In all societies, it is advisable to associate if possible with the highest; not that the highest are always the best, but because, if disgusted there, we can descend at any time; but if we begin with the lowest, to ascend is impossible

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    Money is the most envied, but the least enjoyed. Health is the most enjoyed, but the least envied.

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    There is this difference between the two temporal blessings - health and money; money is the most envied, but the least enjoyed; health is the most enjoyed, but the least envied; and this superiority of the latter is still more obvious when we reflec

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    The family is the most basic unit of government. As the first community to which a person is attached and the first authority under which a person learns to live, the family establishes society's most basic values.

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    To know the pains of power, we must go to those who have it; to know its pleasures, we must go to those who are seeking it. The pains of power are real; its pleasures imaginary.

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    Fame is an undertaker that pays but little attention to the living, but bedizens the dead, furnishes out their funerals, and follows them to the grave

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    He that will not permit his wealth to do any good to others while he is living prevents it from doing any good to himself when he is dead; and by an egotism that is suicidal and has a double edge, cuts himself off from the truest pleasure here, and t

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