Famous Quotes from ...

Friedrich Nietzsche



    Art is the proper task of life.

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    The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude.

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    Faith: not wanting to know what is true.

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    If there is something to pardon in everything, there is also something to condemn.

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    He who has a why to live can bear almost any how.

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    A pair of powerful spectacles has sometimes sufficed to cure a person in love.

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    Does wisdom perhaps appear on the earth as a raven which is inspired by the smell of carrion?

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    The world itself is the will to power - and nothing else! And you yourself are the will to power - and nothing else!

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    The best weapon against an enemy is another enemy.

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    Ah, women. They make the highs higher and the lows more frequent.

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    Amor Fati Love Your Fate, which is in fact your life.

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    What if a demon were to creep after you one night, in your loneliest loneliness, and say, 'This life which you live must be lived by you once again and innumerable times more; and every pain and joy and thought and sigh must come again to you, all in the same sequence. The eternal hourglass will again and again be turned and you with it, dust of the dust!' Would you throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse that demon? Or would you answer, 'Never have I heard anything more divine'?

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    Believe me! The secret of reaping the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment from life is to live dangerously!

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    Strong hope is a much greater stimulant of life than any realized joy could be.

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    It is not a lack of love, but a lack of friendship that makes unhappy marriages.

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    He who cannot give anything away cannot feel anything either.

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    Let us not underestimate the privileges of the mediocre. As one climbs higher, life becomes ever harder; the coldness increases, responsibility increases.

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    No, life has not disappointed me. On the contrary, I find it truer, more desirable and mysterious every year -- ever since the day when the great liberator came to me: the idea that life could be an experiment of the seeker for knowledge -- and not a duty, not a calamity, not trickery.

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    The most instructive experiences are those of everyday life

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    We love life, not because we are used to living but because we are used to loving.

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    Every philosophy is the philosophy of some stage of life.

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    Without music, life would be an error.

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    If you believed more in life you would fling yourself less to the moment.

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    The man consummating his life dies his death triumphantly, surrounded by men filled with hope and making solemn vows.

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    All of life is a dispute over taste and tasting.

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    Without music life would be a mistake.

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    This secret spoke Life herself unto me: "Behold," said she, "I am that which must ever surpass itself."

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    I know of no better life purpose than to perish in attempting the great and the impossible. . . .

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    This life as you live it now and have lived it, you will have to live again and again, times without number, and there will be nothing new in it, but every pain and every joy and every thought and sigh and all the unspeakably small and great in your life must return to you and everything in the same series and sequence -- and in the same way this spider and this moonlight among the trees, and this same way this moment and I myself. The eternal hour glass of existence will be turned again and again -- and you with it, you dust of dust!

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    Is life not a thousand times too short for us to bore ourselves?

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    Vocation is the spine of life.

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    The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time

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    That getting along without false judgments would amount to getting along without life, negating life. To admit untruth as a necessary condition of life: this implies, to be sure, a perilous resistance against customary value-feelings.

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    He who lives by fighting with an enemy has an interest in the preservation of the enemy's life.

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    He that prefers the beautiful to the useful in life will, undoubtedly, like children who prefer sweetmeats to bread, destroy his digestion and acquire a very fretful outlook on the world.

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    Those who are failures from the start, downtrodden, crushed -- it is they, the weakest, who must undermine life among men, who call into question and poison most dangerously our trust in life, in man, and in ourselves.

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    If we have our own why of life, we shall get along with almost any how

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    It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what other men say in whole books what other men do not say in whole books

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    Art is not merely an imitation of the reality of nature, but in truth a metaphysical supplement to the reality of nature, placed alongside thereof for its conquest.

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    Mathematics would certainly have not come into existence if one had known from the beginning that there was in nature no exactly straight line, no actual circle, no absolute magnitude.

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    Let man fear woman when she loves: then she makes any sacrifice, and everything else seems without value to her

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    A woman may very well form a friendship with a man, but for this to endure, it must be assisted by a little physical antipathy.

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    The true man wants two things: danger and play. For that reason he wants woman, as the most dangerous plaything.

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    What is the vanity of the vainest man compared with the vanity which the most modest possesses when, in the midst of nature and the world, he feels himself to be ''man''!

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    We do not belong to those who only get their thought from books, or at the prompting of books, -- it is our custom to think in the open air, walking, leaping, climbing, or dancing on lonesome mountains by preference, or close to the sea, where even the paths become thoughtful.

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    Like tourists huffing and puffing to reach the peak we forget the view on the way up

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    The man who fights too long against dragons becomes a dragon himself

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    Family love is messy, clinging, and of an annoying and repetitive pattern, like bad wallpaper.

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    ''To give style'' to one's character -- a great and rare art! He exercises it who surveys all that his nature presents in strength and weakness and then moulds it to an artistic plan until everything appears as art and reason, and even the weaknesses delight the eye.

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    Undeserved praise causes more pangs of conscience later than undeserved blame, but probably only for this reason, that our power of judgment are more completely exposed by being over praised than by being unjustly underestimated.

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    Men have hitherto treated women like birds which have strayed down to them from the heights; as something more delicate, more fragile, more savage, stranger, sweeter, soulful - but as something which has to be caged up so that it shall not fly away

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    There would be more good marriages if the marriage partners didn't live together.

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    Our destiny exercises its influence over us even when, as yet, we have not learned its nature: it is our future that lays down the law of our today

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    Better living through chemistry

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    One should part from life as Odysseus parted from Nausicaa: with a blessing rather than in love

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    The beauty of nature, like every other kind of beauty, is quite jealous; it demands that one serve it alone.

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    Because men really respect only that which was founded of old and has developed slowly, he who wants to live on after his death must take care not only of his posterity but even more of his past.

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    Love matches, so called, have illusion for their father and need for their mother.

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    Men after death are understood worse than men of the present, but heard better

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    When one does away with oneself one does the most estimable thing possible: one thereby almost deserves to live.

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    These small things -- nutrition, place, climate, recreation, the whole casuistry of selfishness -- are inconceivably more important than everything one has taken to be important so far.

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    The thought of suicide is a powerful solace: by means of it one gets through many a bad night

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    This is the hardest of all: to close the open hand out of love, and keep modest as a giver.

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    To forget one's purpose is the commonest form of stupidity.

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    Of all writings I love only that which is written with blood. Write with blood: and you will discover that blood is spirit.

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    The love of truth has its reward in heaven and even on earth.

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    Men are even lazier than they are timorous, and what they fear most is the troubles with which any unconditional honesty and nudity would burden them.

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    Great indebtedness does not make men grateful, but vengeful

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    Death of one's own free choice, death at the proper time, with a clear head and with joyfulness, consummated in the midst of children and witnesses: so that an actual leave-taking is possible while he who is leaving is still there.

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    What is good? All that heightens the feeling of power, the will to power, power itself in man.

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    There is not enough love and goodness in the world for us to be permitted to give any of it away to imaginary things.

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    Dreaming. -- Either one does not dream at all, or one dreams in an interesting manner. One must learn to be awake in the same fashion: -- either not at all, or in an interesting manner.

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    There is always some madness in love. But there is also always some reason in madness.

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    To exercise power costs effort and demands courage. That is why so many fail to assert rights to which they are perfectly entitled -- because a right is a kind of power but they are too lazy or too cowardly to exercise it. The virtues which cloak these faults are called patience and forbearance.

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    This is what is hardest: to close the open hand because one loves.

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    How strangely simplified and falsified does man live! One does not cease to wonder, once one has eyes to see this wonder!

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    In revenge and in love, woman is more barbarous than man

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    Let us beware of saying there are laws in nature. There are only necessities: there is no one to command, no one to obey, no one to transgress. When you realize there are no goals or objectives, then you realize, too, that there is no chance: for only in a world of objectives does the word ''chance'' have any meaning.

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    Our treasure lies in the beehive of our knowledge. We are perpetually on the way thither, being by nature winged insects and honey gatherers of the mind.

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    Ah, there are so many things betwixt heaven and earth of which only the poets have dreamed!

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    We would not let ourselves be burned to death for our opinions: we are not sure enough of them for that. But perhaps for the right to have our opinions and to change them.

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