Famous Quotes from ...

William Hazlitt



    Rules and models destroy genius and art.

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    Those who are at war with others are not at peace with themselves.

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    Poetry is all that is worth remembering in life.

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    A wise traveler never despises his own country.

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    It is not fit that every man should travel; it makes a wise man better, and a fool worse.

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    Even in the common affairs of life, in love, friendship, and marriage, how little security have we when we trust our happiness in the hands of others!

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    I would like to spend the whole of my life traveling, if I could anywhere borrow another life to spend at home

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    Life is the art of being well deceived; and in order that the deception may succeed it must be habitual and uninterrupted

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    No young man believes he shall ever die

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    The love of liberty is the love of others; the love of power is the love of ourselves.

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    We do not see nature with our eyes, but with our understandings and our hearts.

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    Gallantry to women - the sure road to their favor - is nothing but the appearance of extreme devotion to all their wants and wishes, a delight in their satisfaction, and a confidence in yourself as being able to contribute toward it

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    Women never reason, and therefore they are (comparatively) seldom wrong.

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    One would imagine that books were, like women, the worse for being old : that they open their leaves more cordially; that the spirit of enjoyment wears out with the spirit of novelty; and that after a certain age, it is high time to put them on the s

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    A strong passion for any object will ensure success, for the desire of the end will point out the means

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    We do not die wholly at our deaths: we have moldered away gradually long before.

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    True friendship is self-love at secondhand

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    The fields his study, nature was his book.

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    To be happy, we must be true to nature, and carry our age along with us

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    The greatest grossness sometimes accompanies the greatest refinement, as a natural relief.

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    Poetry is the universal language which the heart holds with nature and itself. He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.

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    Persons without education certainly do not want either acuteness or strength of mind in what concerns themselves, or in things immediately within their observation; but they have no power of abstraction, no general standard of taste, or scale of opinion. They see their objects always near, and never in the horizon. Hence arises that egotism which has been remarked as the characteristic of self-taught men.

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    Anyone who has passed through the regular gradations of a classical education, and is not made a fool by it, may consider himself as having had a very narrow escape.

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    Men of genius do not excel in any profession because they labor in it, but they labor in it because they excel

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    The most sensible people to be met with in society are men of business and of the world, who argue from what they see and know, instead of spinning cobweb distinctions of what things ought to be.

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    There are no rules for friendship. It must be left to itself. We cannot force it any more than love.

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    Perhaps the best cure for the fear of death is to reflect that life has a beginning as well as an end. There was a time when we were not: this gives us no concern - why then should it trouble us that a time will come when we shall cease to be? To die is only to be as we were before we were born.

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    The incentive to ambition is the love of power.

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    The poetical impression of any object is that uneasy, exquisite sense of beauty or power that cannot be contained within itself; that is impatient of all limit; that (as flame bends to flame) strives to link itself to some other image of kindred beau

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    The contemplation of truth and beauty is the proper object for which we were created, which calls forth the most intense desires of the soul, and of which it never tires.

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    He stood bewildered, not appalled, on that dark shore which separates the ancient and the modern world. . . . He is power, passion, self-will personified.

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    If a person has no delicacy, he has you in his power.

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    Every one in a crowd has the power to throw dirt: nine out of ten have the inclination

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    To be capable of steady friendship or lasting love, are the two greatest proofs, not only of goodness of heart, but of strength of mind

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