Famous Quotes from ...

William Shakespeare



    The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, are of imagination all compact.

    view

    As soon go kindle fire with snow, as seek to quench the fire of love with words.

    view

    Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs.

    view

    And this, our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything.

    view

    Fishes live in the sea, as men do a-land; the great ones eat up the little ones.

    view

    One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.

    view

    A peace is of the nature of a conquest; for then both parties nobly are subdued, and neither party loser.

    view

    We are time's subjects, and time bids be gone.

    view

    Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.

    view

    It is a wise father that knows his own child.

    view

    For I can raise no money by vile means.

    view

    Men are April when they woo, December when they wed. Maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.

    view

    The better part of valor is discretion, in the which better part I have saved my life

    view

    The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together.

    view

    But thought's the slave of life, and life time's fool;And time, that takes survey of all the world,Must have a stop.

    view

    Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale.

    view

    The jury, passing on the prisoner's life, may in the sworn twelve have a thief or two guiltier than him they try

    view

    Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man

    view

    By medicine life may be prolonged, yet death will seize the doctor too.

    view

    O excellent! I love long life better than figs.

    view

    Life is a tale told by an idiot -- full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

    view

    The Devil hath power To assume a pleasing shape

    view

    Nothing comes amiss; so money comes withal.

    view

    To be a well-favored man is the gift of fortune, but to write or read comes by nature

    view

    O sir to willful men - The injuries that they themselves procure, Must be their schoolmasters

    view

    What he hath scanted men in hair, he hath given them in wit

    view

    Ever till nowWhen men were fond, I smiled and wondered how.

    view

    O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts,And men have lost their reason.

    view

    That which in mean men we entitle patience is pale cold cowardice in noble breasts.

    view

    For stony limits cannot hold love out.And what love can do that dares love attempt.

    view

    Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight, For I never saw true beauty till this night

    view

    Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee;Corruption wins not more than honesty.

    view

    Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs. Being purged a fire sparkling in lovers eyes, being vexed a sea nourished with lovers tears, What is it else? A madness most discreet, A choking gall and a perserving sweet.

    view

    Methought I heard a voice cry "Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep," the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labor's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief n

    view

    Is it not strange that sheep's guts should hale souls out of men's bodies?

    view

    Base men being in love have then a nobility in their natures more than is native to them

    view

    Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot, But he'll remember with advantages What feats he did that day

    view

    Love give me strength, and strength will help me through. Goodbye, dear father.

    view

    Where love is great, the littlest doubts are fear; When little fears grow great, great love grows there.

    view

    Our foster-nurse of nature is repose

    view

    How quickly nature falls into revoltWhen gold becomes her object!

    view

    For where is any author in the world, Teaches such beauty as a woman's eye? Learning is but an adjunct to ourself

    view

    To me, fair friend, you never can be old. For as you were when first your eye I eyed, such seems your beauty still.

    view

    If angels fight,Weak men must fall, for heaven still guards the right.

    view

    Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments. Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds, or bends with the remover to remove.

    view

    I had rather be a toad And live upon the vapor of a dungeon Than keep a corner in the thing I love For others' uses

    view

    If music be the food of love, play on; give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, the appetite may sicken and so die.

    view

    Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie, which we ascribe to heaven

    view

    There was a star danced, and under that was I born.

    view

    Just death, kind umpire of men's miseries

    view

    He is the most wretched of men who has never felt adversity.

    view

    Is not birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, Manhood, learning, gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality, and such like, the spice and salt that season a man

    view

    The pleasing punishment that women bear.

    view

    Manhood is melted into courtesies, valor into compliment, and men are only turned into tongue, and trim ones, too.

    view

    For in that sleep of death what dreams may come, When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause; there's the respect That makes calamity of so long life

    view

    Were kisses all the joys in bed,One woman would another wed.

    view

    When my love swears that she is made of truth, I do believe her, though know she lies

    view

    We are advertised by our loving friends

    view

    Do all men kill the things they do not love?

    view

    The love of heaven makes one heavenly.

    view

    Not marble, nor the gilded monumentsOf princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme.

    view

    Man, proud man, dressed in a little brief authority, like an angry ape, play such fantastic tricks before high heaven as make the angels weep

    view

    He is evil by his very nature.

    view

    That is my home of love: if I have rang'd, Like him that travels, I return again

    view

    Do you not educate youth at the charge-house on the top of the mountain?

    view

    Maids want nothing but husbands, and when they have them, they want everything.

    view

    If music be the food of love, play on.

    view

    Love goes toward love, as schoolboys from their books;But love from love, toward school with heavy looks.

    view

    Save in the office and affairs of love.

    view

    Daffodils that come before the swallow dares, and takes the winds of March with beauty.

    view

    Beauty's a doubtful good, a glass, a flower, Lost, faded, broken, dead within an hour; And beauty, blemish'd once, for ever's lost, In spite of physic, painting, pain, and cost

    view

    In nature there is no blemish but the mind: none can be called deformed but the unkind

    view

    Yet do I fear thy nature; it is too full o' the milk of human kindness.

    view

    That, if then I had waked after a long sleep, will make me sleep again; and then, in dreaming, the clouds me thought would open and show riches ready to drop upon me; that, when I waked I cried to dream again.

    view

    Absence from those we love is self from self - a deadly banishment.

    view

    If you love her, you cannot see her . . . because love is blind.

    view

    No sooner met but they looked; no sooner looked but they loved; no sooner loved but they sighed; no sooner sighed but they asked one another the reason; no sooner knew the reason but they sought the remedy

    view

    Love to faults is always blind, always is to joy inclined. Lawless, winged, and unconfined, and breaks all chains from every mind.

    view

    Beauty itself doth of itself persuade, The eyes of men without an orator.

    view

    Hasty marriage seldom proveth well

    view

    They do not love that do not show their love.

    view

    Kindness in women, not their beauteous looks, shall win my love.

    view

    O powerful love,that in some respects makes a beast a man,in some other, a man a beast.

    view

    Men have died from time to time, and worms have eaten them, but not for love

    view

    Take heed, be wary how you place your words;Talk like the vulgar sort of market menThat come to gather money for their corn.

    view

    Some true love turned and not a false turned true.

    view

    O, hell! to choose love by another's eyes.

    view

    We are merely cheated of our lives by drunkards

    view

    We cannot fight for love as men may do; We should be woo'd, and were not made to woo

    view

    Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none; be able for thine enemy rather in power than use; and keep thy friend under thine own life's key; be checked for silence, but never taxed for speech

    view

    Things base and vile, holding no quantity,Love can transpose to form and dignity.

    view

    She's beautiful, and therefore to be woo'd She is a woman, therefore to be won

    view

    All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players.

    view

    The course of true love never did run smooth.

    view

    Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin, as self-neglecting.

    view

    The world must be peopled. When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.

    view

    To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;

    view

    How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank.Here will we sit, and let the sounds of musicCreep in our ears; soft stillness, and the nightBecome the touches of sweet harmony.

    view

    Yond' Cassius has a lean and hungry look; He thinks too much: such men are dangerous

    view

    What fates impose, that men must needs abide; It boots not to resist both wind and tide

    view

    Men's judgments areA parcel of their fortunes; and things outwardDo draw the inward quality after them,To suffer all alike.

    view

    She marking them begins a wailing note And sings extemporally a woeful ditty; How love makes young men thrall and old men dote; How love is wise in folly, foolish-witty: Her heavy anthem still concludes in woe, And still the choir of echoes answer so

    view

    Men should be what they seem;Or those that be not, would they might seem none!

    view

    Then let thy love be younger than thyself, Or thy affection cannot hold the bent

    view

    Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind; and therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.

    view

    Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues we write in water

    view

    Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once.

    view

    This bud of love, by summer's ripening breath,May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet.

    view

    Heigh ho! sing, heigh ho! unto the green holly:Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly:Then heigh ho, the holly!This life is most jolly.

    view